Our Dental Blog

Posts for tag: root canal

By Avenue Dental Group
November 08, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  

Are you dealing with extreme dental pain?

Some people think root canals are very painful, but that's just a myth. Root canals actually relieve pain. Modern technology has come a long way, allowing one of your Menomonee Falls, WI, dentists, Dr. Brian Stark, Dr. Thomas J. Dudley, & Dr. Malea M. Blise of Avenue Dental Group, can help relieve your tooth pain.

People need a root canal when a cavity is deep enough to infiltrate the enamel and dentin, reaching the pulp, causing pain. Your Menomonee Falls dentist will need to remove the pulp, clean and disinfect the canal from any bacteria remaining, then seal the canal to prevent any more bacteria from entering.

A tooth consists of four layers. The outermost layer is enamel. It's the white part of the tooth and also happens to be the strongest part. The second layer, under the enamel, is called dentin. This layer is a yellow, softer layer. The third layer of the tooth is called pulp. It consists of blood vessels and nerves. The last layer is the cementum. It anchors the whole tooth to the jawbone.

One of the main reasons people end up needing a root canal is because of poor oral hygiene. If you don't brush your teeth twice a day and floss at least once, then you will suffer from plaque and tartar building up. Plaque and tartar are not only difficult to clean at some point, but you have to deal with bacteria eating away at your teeth.

  • Brushing at least twice a day
  • Flossing once before bed
  • Avoiding sugary foods and drinks, like gum and soda
  • Eat healthy foods, like apples and carrots, that help scrape off plaque
  • Drinking water helps move food debris

If you have any questions, or concerns about root canals, don't hesitate to call your Avenue Dental Group dentist in Menomonee Falls, WI. You can also schedule an appointment at (262) 251-6555.

By Avenue Dental Group
May 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
SurveySaysTheydRatherHaveaRootCanal

Which would you rather have — the flu or a root canal procedure? Nearly 80 percent of people recently surveyed by the American Association of Endodontists wisely chose the root canal. If this takes you by surprise, then let us bring you up to date on root canal treatment today. It’s nothing like the experience that once made it the butt of jokes and a benchmark against which other “undesirable” experiences were measured.

The term “root canal” actually has two meanings. It is part of the pulp-filled chamber at the center of every tooth containing nerves and blood vessels that keeps teeth vital (alive). It’s also the endodontic (endo  = inside; dont = tooth) procedure that treats inflammation and infection in this tissue. Common causes of pulp problems are traumatic damage (for example a crack, chip, or root fracture), deep decay, or gum disease.

The first sign of a problem is typically pain — ranging from acute and intense pangs when biting down, to lingering discomfort after consuming hot or cold foods, to a chronic dull ache and pressure, or tenderness and swelling in nearby gums. The primary pain may abate as the nerves in the pulp die, but the infection will continue, compromising the affected tooth, jeopardizing the health of the surrounding tissues, and often triggering secondary pain.

Pain-Relieving, Tooth-Saving Treatment
Endodontic treatment, by contrast, is no more uncomfortable than having a cavity filled. The tooth and surrounding area are numbed with a local anesthetic before the procedure begins. In order to access the diseased pulp, a small opening is made in the biting surface of the tooth. Tiny instruments are used to remove the pulp, clean and disinfect the root canal(s) and pulp chamber, and prepare the empty tooth interior to receive a biocompatible filling material to prevent bacteria from returning. A permanent crown may be placed over the tooth at that time, or a second visit may be needed. A crown (cap) is important to the tooth's long-term strength and functionality.

For a day or two following treatment you may experience temporary sensitivity, which often responds to an over-the-counter medication like ibuprofen. Occasionally, prescription medications, including antibiotics, may be needed.

All in all, doesn’t saving a tooth sound easier and more constructive than coming down with the flu?

If you would like more information about root canal treatment please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about the subject by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step-By-Step Guide To Root Canal Treatment.”